• Florida Statutes 720: Homeowners Associations

    • Financial Statement Requirements (http://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2013/720.303)
      • An association that meets the criteria of this paragraph shall prepare or cause to be prepared a complete set of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles as adopted by the Board of Accountancy. The financial statements shall be based upon the association’s total annual revenues, as follows:
      1. An association with total annual revenues of $150,000 or more, but less than $300,000, shall prepare compiled financial statements.
      2. An association with total annual revenues of at least $300,000, but less than $500,000, shall prepare reviewed financial statements.
      3. An association with total annual revenues of $500,000 or more shall prepare audited financial statements.
      4. (b)1. An association with total annual revenues of less than $150,000 shall prepare a report of cash receipts and expenditures.
      • An association in a community of fewer than 50 parcels, regardless of the association’s annual revenues, may prepare a report of cash receipts and expenditures in lieu of financial statements required by paragraph (a) unless the governing documents provide otherwise.
    • Turnover Audit Requirements: (http://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2013/720.307)
      • The financial records, including financial statements of the association, and source documents from the incorporation of the association through the date of turnover. The records shall be audited by an independent certified public accountant for the period from the incorporation of the association or from the period covered by the last audit, if an audit has been performed for each fiscal year since incorporation. All financial statements shall be prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and shall be audited in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, as prescribed by the Board of Accountancy, pursuant to chapter 473. The certified public accountant performing the audit shall examine to the extent necessary supporting documents and records, including the cash disbursements and related paid invoices to determine if expenditures were for association purposes and the billings, cash receipts, and related records of the association to determine that the developer was charged and paid the proper amounts of assessments. This paragraph applies to associations with a date of incorporation after December 31, 2007.
  • Florida Statutes 166.241: Municipal Budgeting

    166.241 Fiscal years, budgets, and budget amendments.—

    (1) Each municipality shall establish a fiscal year beginning October 1 of each year and ending September 30 of the following year.
    (2) The governing body of each municipality shall adopt a budget each fiscal year. The budget must be adopted by ordinance or resolution unless otherwise specified in the respective municipality’s charter. The amount available from taxation and other sources, including balances brought forward from prior fiscal years, must equal the total appropriations for expenditures and reserves. At a minimum, the adopted budget must show for each fund, as required by law and sound financial practices, budgeted revenues and expenditures by organizational unit which are at least at the level of detail required for the annual financial report under s. 218.32(1). The adopted budget must regulate expenditures of the municipality, and an officer of a municipal government may not expend or contract for expenditures in any fiscal year except pursuant to the adopted budget.
    (3) The tentative budget must be posted on the municipality’s official website at least 2 days before the budget hearing, held pursuant to s. 200.065 or other law, to consider such budget. The final adopted budget must be posted on the municipality’s official website within 30 days after adoption. If the municipality does not operate an official website, the municipality must, within a reasonable period of time as established by the county or counties in which the municipality is located, transmit the tentative budget and final budget to the manager or administrator of such county or counties who shall post the budgets on the county’s website.

    (4) The governing body of each municipality at any time within a fiscal year or within 60 days following the end of the fiscal year may amend a budget for that year as follows:

    (a) Appropriations for expenditures within a fund may be decreased or increased by motion recorded in the minutes if the total appropriations of the fund is not changed.
    (b) The governing body may establish procedures by which the designated budget officer may authorize budget amendments if the total appropriations of the fund is not changed.
    (c) If a budget amendment is required for a purpose not specifically authorized in paragraph (a) or paragraph (b), the budget amendment must be adopted in the same manner as the original budget unless otherwise specified in the municipality’s charter.
    (5) If the governing body of a municipality amends the budget pursuant to paragraph (4)(c), the adopted amendment must be posted on the official website of the municipality within 5 days after adoption. If the municipality does not operate an official website, the municipality must, within a reasonable period of time as established by the county or counties in which the municipality is located, transmit the adopted amendment to the manager or administrator of such county or counties who shall post the adopted amendment on the county’s website.
  • Florida Local Option Gas Taxes

    County/local governments are authorized to levy up to 12 cents of local option fuel taxes in three separate levies on fuel sold within the county. The funds are used for transportation expenditures.

    • The ninth-cent fuel tax is a tax of 1 cent on every net gallon of motor and diesel fuel sold within a county/municipality.
    • A tax of 1 to 6 cents on every net gallon of motor and diesel fuel sold within a county/municipality.
    • A tax of 1 to 5 cents on every net gallon of motor fuel sold within a county/municipality. Diesel fuel is not subject to this tax.

     

    ALLOWABLE USES:

    Ninth-Cent Fuel Tax (section 336.021, Florida Statutes)and Sixth-Cent Local Option Gas Tax (section 336.025, Florida Statutes): County and municipal governments shall utilize moneys received through the adoption of a 6th cent local option gas tax only for transportation expenditures. F.S. 336.025(7): “transportation expenditures” means expenditures by the local government from local or state shared revenue sources, excluding expenditures of bond proceeds, for the following programs:

    (a) Public transportation operations and maintenance.

    (b) Roadway and right-of-way maintenance and equipment and structures used primarily for the storage and maintenance of such equipment.

    (c) Roadway and right-of-way drainage.

    (d) Street lighting installation, operation, maintenance, and repair.

    (e) Traffic signs, traffic engineering, signalization, and pavement markings, installation, operation, maintenance, and repair.

    (f) Bridge maintenance and operation.

    (g) Debt service and current expenditures for transportation capital projects in the foregoing program areas, including construction or reconstruction of roads and sidewalks.

    Fifth-Cent Local Option Gas Tax (section 336.025, Florida Statutes): County and municipal governments shall use moneys received through the adoption of a 5th cent local option gas tax for the following:

    (a) transportation expenditures needed to meet the requirements of the capital improvements element of an adopted comprehensive plan, or

    (b) expenditures needed to meet immediate local transportation problems, or

    (c) transportation-related expenditures that are critical for building comprehensive roadway networks by local governments.

    For purposes of the 5th-cent local option gas tax, expenditures for the construction of new roads, the reconstruction or resurfacing of existing paved roads, or the paving of existing graded roads shall be deemed to increase capacity and such projects shall be included in the capital improvements element of an adopted comprehensive plan. Expenditures for purposes of this paragraph shall not include routine maintenance of roads.

     

  • Municipal Fuel Taxes – State Revenue Sharing

    The Florida Revenue Sharing Act of 1972 was a major attempt by the Legislature to ensure a minimum level of revenue parity across units of local government.1 Provisions in the enacting legislation created the Revenue Sharing Trust Fund for Municipalities, which currently receives 1.3409 percent of sales and use tax collections, 12.5 percent of the state alternative fuel user decal fee collections, and the net collections from the one-cent municipal fuel tax. However, effective January 1, 2014, the trust fund will no longer receive any state alternative fuel user decal fee collections. An allocation formula serves as the basis for revenue distribution to each municipality that meets strict eligibility requirements. Municipalities must use the funds derived from the one-cent municipal fuel tax for transportation-related expenditures.

    ALLOWABLE USES:

    Funds available under this section shall be used only for purchase of transportation facilities and road and street rights-of-way; construction, reconstruction, and maintenance of roads, streets, bicycle paths, and pedestrian pathways; adjustment of city-owned utilities as required by road and street construction; and construction, reconstruction, transportation-related public safety activities, maintenance, and operation of transportation facilities. Municipalities are authorized to expend the funds received under this section in conjunction with other cities or counties or state or federal government in joint projects. (section 206.605, Florida Statutes)

  • F.A.C. 69I-73.006 – Inventory of Property

    69I-73.006 Inventory of Property.

    (1) Physical Inventory Required – Each governmental unit shall ensure a complete physical inventory of all property is taken annually and whenever there is a change of custodian or change of custodian’s delegate.

    (2) Inventory Forms – The form used to record the physical inventory pursuant to Section 274.02(2), F.S., shall be at the discretion of the governmental unit. However, the form shall display at a minimum for each property item, the following information:

    (a) Date of inventory.

    (b) Identification number.

    (c) Existence of property item (or not).

    (d) Physical location (the city, county, address or building name and room number therein).

    (e) Present physical condition.

    (f) Name and signature of the employee or other individual attesting to the existence of the item.

    (g) In the case of a property group, the number and description of the component items comprising the group.

    (3) Electronic scanning format used for the identification number is acceptable only if the recorded data is downloadable to a computer and can then be used to generate reports that will include all information required on the hardcopy inventory form.

    (4) Unrecorded Property – Any property item found during the conduct of an inventory which meets the requirements for accounting and control as defined in Rule 69I-71.003, F.A.C., and which item is not included on the inventory forms described above, shall have an inventory form created for the item when located. After appropriate investigation to establish the ownership of the item, it shall be added to the governmental unit’s property records or, if ownership cannot be reasonably established, the item may be disposed of in the manner provided by law as applicable to surplus property, pursuant to Section 274.05 and 274.06, F.S.

    (5) Custodian Delegate Shall Not Inventory Certain Items – The custodian delegate shall not personally inventory items for which they are responsible.

    (6) Reconciliation of Inventory to Property Records – Upon completion of a physical inventory:

    (a) The data listed on the inventory forms shall be compared with the individual property records. Noted differences such as location, condition and custodian shall be investigated and corrected as appropriate or alternatively, the item shall be relocated to its assigned location and custodian in the individual property record.

    (b) Items not located during the inventory process shall be promptly reported to the governmental unit which shall cause a thorough investigation to be made. If the investigation determines that the item was stolen, the individual property record shall be so noted, and a report filed with the appropriate law enforcement agency describing the missing item and the circumstances surrounding its disappearance.

    (7) Unaccounted for Property – For items identified as unaccounted for and reported to the State’s Chief Financial Officer, recording of the items as dispositions, or otherwise removing of the items from the property records, shall be subjected to approval of the State’s Chief Financial Officer, as provided in Section 17.041, F.S., and Rule 69I-71.003, F.A.C.

  • Florida Statutes 1013.62 (2) – Allowable Uses of Charter School Capital Outlay Funds

    A charter school’s governing body may use charter school capital outlay funds for the following purposes (section 1013.62(2), Florida Statutes):
    (a) Purchase of real property.
    (b) Construction of school facilities.
    (c) Purchase, lease-purchase, or lease of permanent or relocatable school facilities.
    (d) Purchase of vehicles to transport students to and from the charter school.
    (e) Renovation, repair, and maintenance of school facilities that the charter school owns or is purchasing through a lease-purchase or long-term lease of 5 years or longer.
    (f) Effective July 1, 2008, purchase, lease-purchase, or lease of new and replacement equipment, and enterprise resource software applications that are classified as capital assets in accordance with definitions of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, have a useful life of at least 5 years, and are used to support schoolwide administration or state-mandated reporting requirements.
    (g) Payment of the cost of premiums for property and casualty insurance necessary to insure the school facilities.
    (h) Purchase, lease-purchase, or lease of driver’s education vehicles; motor vehicles used for the maintenance or operation of plants and equipment; security vehicles; or vehicles used in storing or distributing materials and equipment.

    Conversion charter schools may use capital outlay funds received through the reduction in the administrative fee provided in s. 1002.33(20) for renovation, repair, and maintenance of school facilities that are owned by the sponsor.